Around Totnes

Bamber

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The only time we see locomotive hauled passenger trains here are special charters; standard passenger trains are multiple unit train sets nowadays. Back in the 20th century locomotive hauled trains were the rule for longer distance trains, and some of the last were hauled by BR Class 50 locomotives, all long withdrawn but several in preservation. Two of these were on a special through Totnes on Saturday, so I went down to the river bridge to get a picture of this slice of history passing through.

As I waited a buzzard flew across from Snipe Island and perched for a few minutes on the bridge railings.


Buzzard on the bridge
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr
 
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Bamber

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I didn't know which of the 18 existing members of the once 50 strong class of locomotive would be pulling the train. I wasn't much wiser when I took the shot either, as not only did the cameras automatic settings set the shutter speed slow enough to cause blurring (although I do like the effect), but the near side of both locomotives had been furbished to represent two scrapped members of the class, 50011 & 50006. I did find out from a fellow enthusiast that the actual names and numbers of the locomotives were on the other side, 50049 & 50007.


A piece of the past
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

I remember these locomotives from well before the time they were used here in the south west. They were built for use north of the Midlands on the main line from London to Glasgow. At the time the route was electrified as far as Crewe in Cheshire, a major railway junction, where these locos took over from the electrics. I lived near Warrington on that route and saw them on a regular basis as a teenager. They did not receive names until the late 1970s, when the whole class was named for famous warships of the two World Wars.
 
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Bamber

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I often cross paths with this small white cat near the supermarket. I think of her as "the ghost cat" and she generally ignores me, but yesterday she posed nicely for me then came across and rubbed against my legs as I checked the photo before curling up in the grass at my feet.


Purrfect
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr
 

Tsalagi

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A few pictures taken around where I live.

At one time most Town Centres in the UK had a Sweet Shop. The classy ones called themselves Confectioners.



A closer look at those suckers.



A studded front door in Totnes High Street




The top of Totnes High Street narrows until it becomes known as...

The Narrows

with Totnes Castle looming behind.
I lived in Bedford, on Tennyson Road, and directly across the street was a newsagent who had an impressive sweet shop included! The smell was heavenly!
 

Bamber

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We have a mystery. At Dartington Hall is The Barn Cinema in (you guessed it) what was once a barn to one side of the entrance. On facebook yesterday the Dartington Hall Trust posted this message:

The comms team heard a rumour that behind The Barn cinema in a storage area, legend told of an entire wall of mathematical formula written in chalk by a former student some decades back, possibly whilst on a day "trip".

So, in a scene reminiscent of Indiana-Jones-meets-Beautiful-Mind-meets-The-Office, we crept through some long dark corridors to find... yup.

And this is but a small section.

There are lots of rumours but if you KNOW something we are eager to know the backstory facts. Please do get in touch either in comments below or by private message. Perhaps the person who is actually responsible is reading this?

Also, we are doubtful but does any part of this make any fathomable mathematical sense?

And attached was this picture:


 

Romford Lad

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Bloody hell ~ it can't have been that long ago ~ written words are in English [modern] and I think I can make out logs and cosines , plus Pi,
would love to know the answer to this one ~ as I'm sure everyone else connected with it would as well. Some University Prof somewhere
may be able to shine some light on it.
 

Bamber

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The three springs, left to right, are named Toad, Long Crippler and Snake.


Toad, Long Crippler and Snake
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

Long crippler is an old Devonian name for a slow worm.

Many pagan "new agers" (we're not exactly short of those in Totnes) leave offerings and messages in chalk.

The grating at the bottom left is over the exit stream. It was discovered in 2003 that this leads to a long forgotten triangular plunge pool in what is now Leechwell Gardens and had now been restored.
 
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