Bamber anecdote

squirt

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I've caught customers taking them out of the store, and when I approached them, they acted like they didn't have a clue that the baskets can't leave the store lol it's the same mentality that allows them to think that grazing in the store is appropriate, let your kid have a string cheese, no big deal if he throws the empty package on the floor and it never gets paid for, Kroger can afford it, right?
 

roadkill

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My sister is doing what siblings do and trying to embarrass me on facebook by posting this picture of me in my pram, with her looking on.



Neither of us have a clue what it is I've got on my head.
looks like the sailor hat that my grampa gave me when we went fishing...lol
 

Bamber

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On a lighter note...

A large number of preserved steam locomotives are owned by individuals or societies who have no lines on which to run them. They are generally rented out to heritage railways to operate their trains. Some of these railways are no longer connected to the national network, some are. Moving the engines between these sites is not always possible by rail even when the line is connected. Things have changed since the days of universal steam and the loading gauge has changed, meaning the engines are too high or wide to be used safely. This means quite a few movements take place on the road, with large low-loader trailers pulled by trucks.

I heard on the radio this morning that one of the main roads into South Devon was partly blocked by a steam train coming here from Somerset: the truck had failed. I checked the internet to see if there was a picture (I couldn't find one), but it isn't that uncommon. There has been at least one engine severely damaged by the trailer catching fire and other less serious incidents over the years. The only photos I could find were of this movement in 2015 when the trailer actually broke under the weight of the locomotive.


 

squirt

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ya'll have trains without rails ... here we have rails without trains lol
I love that ya'll still use trains so much!

xsandos1.gif
 

Bamber

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In summer I generally wear my straw Panama hat, but as the weather is currently quite breezy and prone to intermittent showers I have been wearing my bowler. Yesterday it provided me with a couple of incidents which I found amusing.

On the way to work, as I passed the bus stop I heard a woman (a holidaymaker, I think) in her 60s mutter "Are you a Rabbi or a businessman?". I'm pretty sure she didn't realise she'd said it out loud, as when I grinned at her and said "I'm not a Rabbi." she gave me a startled look.

Thinking about that reaction kept a grin on my face most of the way to work.

On the way home I stopped at Morrison's supermarket to get some salad stuffs and as I left the shop I noticed a blue eyed mongrel dog tied up taking a drink of water from the thoughtfully provided trough. It stopped drinking and stared at me, water dripping from its chops, until I had walked out of sight. It wasn't a "come here and pet me" stare, nor and aggressive stare, but struck me as a "can't believe my eyes" sort of look. I'd love to know what was going on in that dogs mind.

Thinking about that reaction kept a grin on my face most of the way home.
 

Romford Lad

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Well Phil, you rarely see a bowler worn these days ~ and yet, as you have found out, it's one of the most practical hats made [stands up to all weathers ~ would have liked to see the women's face when you said that, I've got a smile just thinking about the situation
 

Bamber

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Over 12 years ago I lived in North Devon, in the village of Bradiford. Next to Bradiford is Pilton, once a separate town but now part of Barnstaple, possibly the oldest Borough in England. Pilton still has its own distinct and individual feel to it, helped by the many old buildings including the church, part of which is 11th century. In the reign of Edward III (1327-1377) Pilton was granted the right to hold an annual festival. Over the years this died out, but was revived in 1982 and has developed over the years since then, incorporating Green Man Day fairly early on.

I visited last year but got a head cold on the morning and rained on several times which didn't help matters, but I did get to meet old friends I hadn't seen for more than 10 years. I decided to try again this year and had much better luck, both health and weather wise.

The day started cloudy and was forecast to stay that way in South Devon, but North Devon was predicted to brighten up around mid-day. I got to Barnstaple around 10:30 and there was pretty uniform cloud cover, but the sun was trying to break through.


Looking east from Barnstaple Bridge
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

I could see just out of shot to the left brightly dressed people forming up for the Pilton Festival parade.
 
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Bamber

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I took that photo from the bridge over the River Taw, called The Long Bridge, then completed the crossing to the north bank next to the museum and clock tower, where the members of the parade had assembled.


Preparing for the parade
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

The odd green thing right of centre is the Pilton Worm, similar to a Chinese Dragon and populated by local children.
 
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Bamber

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I took a route avoiding the High Street to get to Pilton before the parade. On the way I passed the showroom of a window firm, Anglia Windows. I know an old regular at The Albert in Totnes, a Cornishman by the name of Russell Fanelli, is manager there and as I saw him through the doorway popped in to have a natter.

When I got to Pilton Park I saw my old friend Terry, who had dressed as a sheikh to play my husband that time I wore a wedding dress all day for a charity head shave, regaling the parents of another friend of mine who now lives in northern Spain. Terry had been stood in exactly the same spot the year before.


Terry, telling 'em
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

By this time the sun had broken through and it became a very warm day.
 
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Bamber

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Behind the nearest building is Pilton Church of St Mary the Virgin. On a future visit when things are a bit quieter I must take a few shots of it, if I can. The church is fairly closely encircled by buildings so a decent shot may be a challenge.


Bull Hill
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr
 

Bamber

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I went back to the lower end of Pilton Street to the Reform Inn, had a few beers at the beer festival and met up with more old friends. I may go back in a couple of weeks as my friend from Spain, Rusty, is coming back to see his parents during the school summer holidays (he teaches English over there), and we haven't met up for almost 13 years.

It was, to quote Wallace & Grommit, a grand day out.
 

konifur

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Over 12 years ago I lived in North Devon, in the village of Bradiford. Next to Bradiford is Pilton, once a separate town but now part of Barnstaple, possibly the oldest Borough in England. Pilton still has its own distinct and individual feel to it, helped by the many old buildings including the church, part of which is 11th century. In the reign of Edward III (1327-1377) Pilton was granted the right to hold an annual festival. Over the years this died out, but was revived in 1982 and has developed over the years since then, incorporating Green Man Day fairly early on.

I visited last year but got a head cold on the morning and rained on several times which didn't help matters, but I did get to meet old friends I hadn't seen for more than 10 years. I decided to try again this year and had much better luck, both health and weather wise.

The day started cloudy and was forecast to stay that way in South Devon, but North Devon was predicted to brighten up around mid-day. I got to Barnstaple around 10:30 and there was pretty uniform cloud cover, but the sun was trying to break through.


Looking east from Barnstaple Bridge
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

I could see just out of shot to the left brightly dressed people forming up for the Pilton Festival parade.
I have never been to Barnstaple on my travels.Is it worth a two nighter?
 

Bamber

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I have never been to Barnstaple on my travels.Is it worth a two nighter?
Probably not. There's a lot of the old town gone, demolished in the 60s and 70s. You could maybe spend half a day looking round Pilton and the few older buildings in the centre of Barnstaple but that'd be it.