Do we still need the Electoral College?

Tsalagi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
5,017
Likes
2,374
#21
[QUOTE="TwiztedAngel, post: 4956059]The electoral college is the reason why we do not vote. The vast majority of Texas will vote republican, no matter what. This means our votes are meaningless and worthless.

By "we", it is my mother, husband, and I.[/QUOTE]
Thank you for your votes for Trump!

T
 

squirt

Administrator
Joined
May 5, 2004
Messages
804,096
Likes
73,582
#22
Michigan called for Trump last night, giving him 306 electorates vs Clinton's 232

they also say that Hillary got New Hampshire, the other undecided state

giving Trump 30 states to Clinton's 20

still shows Clinton winning the popular vote by about 400,000, but he won the electoral vote 57% to her 43%[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]
 

KingHomie

Sex for Brains
Joined
Nov 25, 2003
Messages
76,238
Likes
1,223
#23
Well for now I believe we do need to continue with the electoral vote (as Squirt pointed out above) until some other form of voting can be initiated that the states like Texas and California don't make the decision for the country as a whole. At the same time, I think ALL votes should be counted, including the absentee votes if they want to go with the popular vote - too many military and others working overseas can't get their vote counted is not fair to them or the United States
 

squirt

Administrator
Joined
May 5, 2004
Messages
804,096
Likes
73,582
#24
what I didn't know until this election :blush:
... is that the electoral college is part of our constitution
and to get rid of it requires ratifying the constitution, which is difficult in the best of circumstances
and it would be a long process, certainly not finished in time to save Clinton
and it's doubtful that it would be considered in any way by a Republican Congress
 

squirt

Administrator
Joined
May 5, 2004
Messages
804,096
Likes
73,582
#26
I looked everywhere ... ok ... apparently not everywhere lol
thank you! :bravo:
 

muchtrouble10

Jokeroo Legend
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
111,230
Likes
1,328
#27
[QUOTE="squirt, post: 4956943]I looked everywhere ... ok ... apparently not everywhere lol
thank you! :bravo:
[/QUOTE]

I made Google look for me. lol :xxsandoos:
 

KingHomie

Sex for Brains
Joined
Nov 25, 2003
Messages
76,238
Likes
1,223
#28
Don't you just love Google? It is my left hand (not right because I am left handed)


and I am glad to see the final results,, now if all of the protestors that are also rioting should face up and stop that nonsense
 

Tsalagi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
5,017
Likes
2,374
#29
Article II, Section 1, Clause 2[/URL] of the Constitution states:[/FONT][/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
Trying to do away with it would require amending the Constitution.
This would require a 2/3 majority of the House of Representatives, a 2/3 majority of the Senate, AND a 2/3 majority of states to hold elections and voting it down.
As the British say, "Not bloody likely, mate!"

Likewist, to impeach the President, 2/3 of the House must approve articles of imprachment, then 2/3 of the Senators must then vote to convict him/her. With a Republican majority in both houses of Congress, The chances of that happening are as likely as


T
 

KingHomie

Sex for Brains
Joined
Nov 25, 2003
Messages
76,238
Likes
1,223
#30
Great info, thanks for sharing it, I didn't know the part about the States only Congress and the Senate
 

Tsalagi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
5,017
Likes
2,374
#31
For example, the ex-Confederate states could not reenter the US until they ratified the 13th, 14th and 15 Amendments (Civil Rights).

T
 

Tsalagi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
5,017
Likes
2,374
#32
[FONT=&quot]Regardless of what happens on December 19, Republican candidate Trump will become the elected President on January 6, 2017, unless some vastly unforeseen event prevents Congress from counting the Electoral College votes during a joint meeting of Congress, or the President-elect is unable to take his oath on Friday, January 20, 2017.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In the end, the House and Senate must agree on any changes made to the Electoral College vote during the in-person Electoral College voting that takes place on December 19 at 50 state capitals and in the District of Columbia. When the official vote certificates are opened by Congress on January 6, the Constitution allows challenges to “faithless electors” who switch their votes, as long as one member of the House and one member of the Senate agree on the same challenge. If a challenge is upheld, the faithless elector’s vote is discarded.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Given that the Republicans control the House and the Senate in the next Congress, an unlikely possible outcome would be that enough faithless electors put Trump’s tally below the 270 votes needed to win the Electoral College vote. In that case, the majority of House and Senate Republicans would invalidate those faithless votes, triggering a run-off contingent election in the House and Senate that Trump and Mike Pence would win.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Here is how the Constitutional process works:
1. On December 13, each state Governor must have a certificate of ascertainment finished. That document lists the names of the electors for each presidential and vice presidential candidate, and the number of votes received by each candidate.
2. On December 19, electors gather in each state and the federal district to cast their votes. Any disputes within the states about electors must settled by December 13. At each Electoral College voting sessions, the electors cast their committed votes for president and vice president. In 82 cases since 1787, electors at meetings became “faithless electors” when they voted for another candidate on their own.
3. At this point, each state Electoral College sends a certificate of vote to the Vice President of the United States Joe Biden, acting as president of the Senate. The certificates must be received by December 28 in Washington. The Office of the Federal Register determines the certificates are sealed and legitimate documents.
4. On January 6, 2017, Biden opens the joint session held in the House of Representatives at 1 p.m. Two sets of tellers open the sealed vote certificates in alphabetical order by state, and the results are read into the congressional records. After the results are announced, Biden then asks if there are objections from any member of Congress. Each objection must be made in writing and signed by one House and one Senate member.
5. If there are objections, the House and Senate meet separately, with a two-hour limit on the meetings. Each member can only speak for a maximum of five minutes. When the joint session resumes, the results of the meetings are announced. Both the Senate and the House must agree to reject an Electoral College vote or votes.
Under the 12th Amendment, if there is no majority winner in the Electoral College, the House picks the President and the Senate picks the Vice President in contingent elections. The top three Electoral College vote getters for President are put up for the vote in the House; the top two Vice Presidential candidates are voted on in the Senate.
from Scott Bomboy, the editor in chief of the National Constitution Center.
[/FONT]
 

sybarite

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2005
Messages
3,576
Likes
80
#33
Yes, we absolutely need the electoral college, otherwise, the larger cities would determine the vote every time. We need an electorate in rural areas so our voice can be heard as well!
 

Romford Lad

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
32,049
Likes
6,205
#35
Like most Brits ~ I find the whole process of the presidential elections quite baffling ~ but have been trying to follow this last one [with great interest] I'm grateful to Tsalagi for the post, which 'I think' makes it easier for me to understand both the principles and reasons for the electoral college ~ however, which ever way you look at making sure fairness in voting is carried out, and that every one has one vote and should be considered ~ there appears [to an outsider] many opportunities for that principle to be over~looked; I have the Washington Post in my email each evening [and some very interesting articles are there ~ I would suggest one by Lawrence Lessig [Prof. Havard Law School] on the 26th I think, which made me think of the complete and total confusion that could be set in place, given certain circumstances.
 

Country17

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 26, 2007
Messages
27,701
Likes
835
#36
[QUOTE="sybarite, post: 4960408]Yes, we absolutely need the electoral college, otherwise, the larger cities would determine the vote every time. We need an electorate in rural areas so our voice can be heard as well![/QUOTE]

Exactly! I for one, do not want New York and California to determine our president.
 

KingHomie

Sex for Brains
Joined
Nov 25, 2003
Messages
76,238
Likes
1,223
#37
Nor do I and I am from California - damn democrats run this state an spend, spend, more taxes, spend, more taxes,, bastards don't know what a budget is all about, they want to leave the flood gates open from the south so more taxes to support their FREE medi-care and everything else including letting them have a drivers license, (no insurance) and there you are,, they will vote for anything and most don't even know what they are voting for, oh you didn't know illegals voted?? why do you think there are so many deceased people voting and those that are incarcerated,, hell anyone can vote here dead or alive,, :steam:
 

Tsalagi

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
5,017
Likes
2,374
#38
[QUOTE="Romford Lad, post: 4963199]Like most Brits ~ I find the whole process of the presidential elections quite baffling ~ but have been trying to follow this last one [with great interest] I'm grateful to Tsalagi for the post, which 'I think' makes it easier for me to understand both the principles and reasons for the electoral college ~ however, which ever way you look at making sure fairness in voting is carried out, and that every one has one vote and should be considered ~ there appears [to an outsider] many opportunities for that principle to be over~looked; I have the Washington Post in my email each evening [and some very interesting articles are there ~ I would suggest one by Lawrence Lessig [Prof. Havard Law School] on the 26th I think, which made me think of the complete and total confusion that could be set in place, given certain circumstances. [/QUOTE]
It's sort of like the House of Commons then. Rotten boroughs, seats that are "safe" to keep people in office, our "no taxation without representation" argument during the Colonial period when the British West Indies sugar interests held dozens of seats and the colonies of North America held zero.
Man is imperfect and mostly concerned with HIS privileges and bugger everone else.

T
 

Romford Lad

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
32,049
Likes
6,205
#39
[QUOTE="Tsalagi, post: 4963333]It's sort of like the House of Commons then. Rotten boroughs, seats that are "safe" to keep people in office, our "no taxation without representation" argument during the Colonial period when the British West Indies sugar interests held dozens of seats and the colonies of North America held zero.
Man is imperfect and mostly concerned with HIS privileges and bugger everone else.

T
[/QUOTE]

An interesting point my friend ~ the only difference being that over here [a tiny land mass compared to your country] each member of parliament is elected for an area which [very roughly] has a similar number of voters [albeit that plans are afoot to change some of the boundaries]. Whilst you have huge 'state' areas, some with vast numbers of electors, whilst others, have a very much smaller electorate; so I can understand the reasoning behind the college in that it 'should' bring about fairness across the country. To what extent it works is for someone far more educated in your constitution and electoral law than I.
 

squirt

Administrator
Joined
May 5, 2004
Messages
804,096
Likes
73,582
#40
the number of electoral votes each state gets is dependent on the population, which is the same number of representatives in the House of Representatives
then each state gets an additional 2 electoral votes for the 2 members from each state to the Senate
if you go back to my map about who won what states, it's a bit clearer how it works
Trump won 30 states to Clinton's 20

re: Michigan - they're saying it's still too close to call