What is it? #426

Bamber

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
41,992
Likes
867
#1
These are 4-20cm tall (1½-8ins), but there are larger and smaller examples.
What are they?

 

roadkill

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 27, 2005
Messages
21,658
Likes
1,114
#3
they are worn around the neck..i cant think of the proper name..but they look Mayan
 

stevent222

Jokeroo Immortal
Joined
Apr 3, 2006
Messages
245,121
Likes
1,290
#5
They are called:

"BLING"
Those are stones concidered as money or how weatlhy a person is before Samual Goldman dug up some shinny stones he later called 'Goldl' and said it was more precious then the stones they have. Later on Sam opened up a gold shop and then a jewerly store and punded out some pretty shapes and of some of the many Gods they worshiped

Like this...


 

kipper

Super Moderator
Joined
May 8, 2004
Messages
29,189
Likes
454
#7
I'll wait in the loo methinks and read a newspaper before giving a clue....:hehehaha:
 

Romford Lad

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
29,175
Likes
423
#8
Ummmm right Kip, don't make a noise!!

I thought they were something like 'charms' to either ward off, or praise something ~ each have holes in them for attaching to something ~ possible a chain ~ but I haven't a clue really [at the moment that is]
 

kipper

Super Moderator
Joined
May 8, 2004
Messages
29,189
Likes
454
#9
[QUOTE="Romford Lad, post: 5064544]Ummmm right Kip, don't make a noise!!

I thought they were something like 'charms' to either ward off, or praise something ~ each have holes in them for attaching to something ~ possible a chain ~ but I haven't a clue really [at the moment that is]
[/QUOTE]


The cryptic clues were in my post....
 

Romford Lad

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
29,175
Likes
423
#11
[QUOTE="kipper, post: 5064575]The cryptic clues were in my post....[/QUOTE]

Yep mate ~ rather gathered that, and have been thinking about it ~ but your cryptic clues and the normal pattern of cryptic clues in the Telegraph are [shall we say] slightly different ~ but haven't given up on it yet... LOL

One thing that is in my thoughts, is that newspapers were cut up for use in the loo ~ but where this damn things come into it, I have no idea.
 

Manzy

Jokeroo VIP Status
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
58,805
Likes
1,134
#12
[QUOTE="kipper, post: 5064540]I'll wait in the loo methinks and read a newspaper before giving a clue....:hehehaha:[/QUOTE]

:nana:

Is it the toilet handles?

You always know em' all pfffft lol :whip:
 

Romford Lad

Jokeroo Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
29,175
Likes
423
#13
Ahhh my dear Manzy ~ I too thought about that, and then wondered how a one and a half inch 'coin' looking thing could be one of those ~ but you may well be on the right track ..LOL
 

Manzy

Jokeroo VIP Status
Joined
Dec 22, 2003
Messages
58,805
Likes
1,134
#14
Peter I don't know what else it could be for a loo unless its part of plunger? lol
 

kipper

Super Moderator
Joined
May 8, 2004
Messages
29,189
Likes
454
#16
[QUOTE="Romford Lad, post: 5064600]Yep mate ~ rather gathered that, and have been thinking about it ~ but your cryptic clues and the normal pattern of cryptic clues in the Telegraph are [shall we say] slightly different ~ but haven't given up on it yet... LOL

One thing that is in my thoughts, is that newspapers were cut up for use in the loo ~ but where this damn things come into it, I have no idea.
[/QUOTE]


I'm afraid I pulled the wool over your eyes Pierre, the newspaper and loo were Red herrings, the clue is on the play on words in the sentence....:thinking:
 

kipper

Super Moderator
Joined
May 8, 2004
Messages
29,189
Likes
454
#18
[FONT=&quot]O, what a tangled web we weave when first we practise to deceive!...:heehee:[/FONT]
 

Bamber

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
41,992
Likes
867
#19
The sort of cryptic clue Romford Lad would be more used to:

One hundred? One thousand? Wait! Sounds like one of these (4,6).
 

Bamber

Super Moderator
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
41,992
Likes
867
#20
These are thought to have originated in the Neolithic age and were common until well into the Bronze age in Europe. They were still used by the Sami people of Finland and Norway in the 1950s.