Bamber anecdote

kipper

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This post brought back memories:

Back in the late '70s and early '80s I lived in Bromsgrove, roughly 14 miles from the city of Worcester. There were about a dozen or so of us who rode motorcycles used regularly to visit this pub at the weekend...



...we used The Plough for a couple of reasons.
1. They sold draught rough (alcoholic) cider.
2. The police used to drink there too. This meant the pub was never raided for 'after hours' drinking. The coppers used the lounge (through the door in the picture). We used the bar, in through a door at the rear.

As you can see, fairly close to the cathedral.
Quite handy then, from bloody Marys to hail Marys..😁
 

kipper

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Here in the UK there is a license fee for possessing a TV (it's how the BBC is financed: no advertising revenue). It currently costs £157.50 (around $210) per annum. The last time I had a TV, almost 30 years ago, it was less than £80.

When I changed address a year ago I almost instantly received a letter from the TV licensing authority saying I didn't have a TV license. I wrote to them saying I didn't have a TV. I also told them I would NOT allow them access to the property without a warrant.

Today I received a letter with TV LICENSING on the envelope. I expected it to be a similar letter to last year, but no: it is a confirmation that I don't need a license. I didn't even know there was such a thing!

So I have what is, in effect, a non-TV license.
🤣


I wonder what faceless bureaucrat though this one up!


I've been helping a mate do up a property to move into. We gutted the place and started afresh. He received 3 reminders saying the property had no TV licence, it also had no aerial or windows for that matter...lol. The last demand with menaces said they'd send an inspector even after he'd replied the property was currently empty. Said inspector duly turned up one day to see the non existent licence, we invited him in, he looked around at the tools and plaster scattered everywhere, and said, the property is empty, (no shit Sherlock) then he said, you'll need a license when you move in, mate said I'll transfer the one I've got, inspector said you never said you had another property, Mick said, well you never asked!!! ... End of conversation...lol
 

Bamber

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End of an era.

I moved to Torquay in 1986. The company I worked for had an office on the harbour front. In 1989 the office moved down the coast to Paignton, then again in 1991 to Dartington, the other side of Totnes. In Dartington I used to visit the Cott Inn every lunchtime for my main meal of the day and got to know a good few of the regulars. I took to having one night a week at The Cott, where one of the regulars was Bill Maclening, one of 6 brothers. I only got to know 3 of these men; Bill, Ed (who drank down the road in The Queens Arms) and Andy (who drank in Totnes).

I left South Devon and moved to North Devon in 1995. When I moved back south to Totnes in 2005, the first person I met when I went to The Albert was Andy Maclening. He was the barman that night and I found out that his wife Doreen worked there part time too, as a barmaid. They both retired from bar work four or five years ago.

I learned a couple of weeks ago that they both were infected with Covid. Doreen was isolated at home, but Andy had breathing problems and went to hospital. Four days ago he was looking forward to going home but took a sudden turn for the worse: he had a lung infection. This turned to pneumonia and he died in the early hours of this morning.



Andy Maclening
by Phil Gayton, on Flickr

You will be missed, Andy Mac, not least by the landlords of Totnes. RIP me old mate.
 
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Bamber

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We'm 'ad a bit of excitement down yur in Dev'n today. WWII bomb discovered in Exeter on Friday, exploded by the bomb squad at 6:10PM today. (I've no idea why the video goes on for so long after the explosion)


Unexploded wartime ordnance is relatively common on the coast, not so much in inland locations.
 
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Bamber

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discovered where ... in somebody's back yard?

View attachment 124212
Found by builders in private grounds near university halls of residence. More than 2,600 people, including 1,400 students, evacuated. The bomb squad contained that explosion with 400 tonnes of sand.

This is the bomb. Compare it with the fence panels to see how huge it was.
exeter bomb.jpg
 
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Bamber

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And so it goes on. Just spoke to my boss for the first time this year. He rang to ask if I was OK with staying on with him a little longer; the customer wants to extend the contract until March 2022. So, no redundancy this year for me.
 

Bamber

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My great nephew Tobes (Toby) eleventh birthday today. His mum, my niece Nikki, has made him another farming based cake (they're farmers both by occupation and name).

 

Bamber

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Instant memory. This post:


Took me back to the early '80s. Sunday lunch time in what was my local at the time, Ye Olde Black Cross in Bromsgrove.

Stan, one of the regulars, was at the bar with his friend Doc. It was getting towards closing time (Sunday hours were 11 - 2).

Suddenly Wendy, Stan's wife, appears with a dinner plate with a full Sunday lunch on it (roast beef, Yorkshire pudding, roast and boiled potatoes, carrots, cabbage, cauliflower, gravy) and dumps it over Stan's head.

He'd promised to be home by 1.

He stayed until closing time. When he got home he couldn't get in: Wendy had paid Sunday emergency rates to get a locksmith out to change all the locks on the house.

Stan spent two weeks sofa surfing before she'd let him back in.
 
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