More Archaelogical Evidence

hortysir

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3,000-year-old palace in Israel linked to biblical King David - NBC News.com

Israeli archaeologists say they have found the remains of a palace that they believe was a seat of power for the biblical King David — but other experts say that claim shouldn't be taken as the gospel truth.
 

Ms.Diablo50

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I saw this a couple of days ago myself. makes me wonder even more about the stories in the bible....
 

squirt

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*no evidence needed*

what a cool find! only time will tell! lol :heehee:

:bravo: :pray:

:rapture:
 

hortysir

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:rapture:

"If I were not going to prepare you a place I would not have told you so"
:inlove:
 

squirt

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"and if I go prepare a place for you, I shall come again and bring you to join me"

:pray:
 

hortysir

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[video=youtube;bmaXXa36oek]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmaXXa36oek[/video]
 

squirt

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hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul ...

... and sings the tune without the words and never stops at all :pray:
 

hortysir

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Proof of the Exodus! | Simcha Jacobovici TV

The black granite inscription corroborates the story of the parting of the sea, as told in Exodus 14. There is a unique hieroglyph on it: three waves and two knives.

Searching for a way to translate this symbol, Griffith rendered it as “whirlpool”. But Egyptologist James Hoffmeier has suggested that we look at the hieroglyphic literally. Seen in this way, the obvious translation is the “parting of the sea” or the “parted sea”.
The El Arish stone is one of four similar shrines that were once a part of the Temple of Per-Sopdu at Saft el-Henna. The shrines were later disassembled and dispersed, one shrine remained on site and the other three placed at the major points of entry into Egypt (Canopus, Nubia and El Arish). They seem to have served some kind of amuletic function, protecting ancient Egypt from similar disasters.
 
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